Difference between revisions of "Internet of things"

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"Internet of Things," or "IoT," refers to the growing trend of electronic devices being able to connect to the Internet, from cell phones to coffee makers. This interconnectivity presents both opportunity for innovation (a coffee maker connected to one's alarm might be set to begin brewing as soon as their 6 AM alarm goes off), as well as logistical challenges (if everything from cars to computers are connected, doesn't that mean that those things are vulnerable to hacking and malware?).<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.forbes.com/sites/jacobmorgan/2014/05/13/simple-explanation-internet-things-that-anyone-can-understand/#689e61ce1d09|name=A Simple Explanation Of 'The Internet Of Things'|org=Forbes|date=June 28, 2018}}</ref>
 
"Internet of Things," or "IoT," refers to the growing trend of electronic devices being able to connect to the Internet, from cell phones to coffee makers. This interconnectivity presents both opportunity for innovation (a coffee maker connected to one's alarm might be set to begin brewing as soon as their 6 AM alarm goes off), as well as logistical challenges (if everything from cars to computers are connected, doesn't that mean that those things are vulnerable to hacking and malware?).<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.forbes.com/sites/jacobmorgan/2014/05/13/simple-explanation-internet-things-that-anyone-can-understand/#689e61ce1d09|name=A Simple Explanation Of 'The Internet Of Things'|org=Forbes|date=June 28, 2018}}</ref>
  

Latest revision as of 15:58, 28 May 2019

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"Internet of Things," or "IoT," refers to the growing trend of electronic devices being able to connect to the Internet, from cell phones to coffee makers. This interconnectivity presents both opportunity for innovation (a coffee maker connected to one's alarm might be set to begin brewing as soon as their 6 AM alarm goes off), as well as logistical challenges (if everything from cars to computers are connected, doesn't that mean that those things are vulnerable to hacking and malware?).[1]

IoT innovations have the potential for significant innovation in a number of industries, including logistics, fintech, agriculture, transportation, and manufacturing. Companies currently involved with exploring IoT technology include Microsoft, Amazon, Google and IBM.[2]

Some companies, such as VeChain, utilize distributed ledger and digital token technology to improve IoT capabilities.[3][4]

References