David Kleiman

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David Kleiman
David kleiman.jpg
Occupation Cybersecurity expert (deceased)
Location West Palm Beach, Florida, USA
LinkedIn Profile
Website Dave Kleiman's personal website

David Kleiman was a computer expert specializing in cybersecurity. He is one of the people some believed may have been Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of bitcoin.[1] He died in 2013.

Life and Career

David Kleiman was born in 1967. He was adopted by Louis and Regina Kleiman of Palm Beach, Florida. In 1987, he enlisted in the United States Army, serving as a helicopter technician. He left the armed forces in 1990 with an honorable discharge. In 1995, Kleiman was involved in a motorcycle accident that left him bound to a wheelchair. After the accident, he began spending much more time with computers. He was a member of a number of organizations, including the International Association of Counter-Terrorism and Security Professionals (IACSP), the International Society of Forensic Computer Examiners (ISFCE), Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA), the High Technology Crime Investigation Association (HTCIA), the Network and Systems Professionals Association (NaSPA), Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE), Anti-Terrorism Accreditation Board (ATAB), and ASIS International.

Kleiman also served in a position at InfraGard, a cybersecurity organization jointly owned and operated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) as well as technology professionals in the private sector. Kleiman was known by the nickname “Dave Mississippi” due to the string of three-letter certificates that followed his name. He often gave talks at professional and academic conferences on a variety of topics related to computer technology and cybersecurity. He also appeared on CNN and ABC News as a cybersecurity expert and contributed to online mailing lists, such as the one used by Satoshi Nakamoto to develop bitcoin.

An email sent to Kleiman by Craig Wright revealed that the two had a working or personal relationship prior to the publication of the bitcoin whitepaper. In the email, Wright asked Kleiman to edit the paper. In 2010, Kleiman became infected with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a condition that would persist until his death in 2013.[2][3][4]

Kleiman's brother Ira later filed a lawsuit against Wright for $10 billion. Ira Kleiman alleged that Wright falsified documents in order to transfer bitcoins held by David Kleiman after his death. The lawsuit also includes accusations of intellectual property theft.[5][6]

References